Research Papers

Review of health implications of dog spay/neuter

Spaying and neutering can lead to long-term health problems in dogs. A recent review article summarizes these problems and illuminates the role of luteinizing hormone (LH). Ovaries and testes — the gonads — produce hormones such as estrogen and testosterone. Research has shown that removal of the gonads through spaying and neutering is associated with… Read more


Electromagnetic therapy effective for enlarged prostate

An inexpensive electromagnetic therapy quickly improved outcomes for men with enlarged prostates, according to a new study by researchers at Sapienza University of Rome with funding from the Parsemus Foundation. The results were published recently in Andrology, the highest ranked journal in andrological research. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), enlargement of the prostate, is a common… Read more


Spayed female dogs at higher risk of brain tumors

In a novel study using canine brain scans, scientists have reported that spayed females had an increased relative risk of brain tumors — 11 times that of intact females. The authors cited the importance of estrogen to brain health, and related their work in dogs to findings in women regarding higher incidence of dementia than… Read more


Connection between postmenopausal breast cancer and heart disease

Current treatments for breast cancer result in an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, as reported in the journal Menopause. A group of postmenopausal women who survived breast cancer were compared to a matched group without breast cancer. The Brazilian research team found that previous breast cancer was associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, atherosclerosis, high triglycerides, and… Read more


Health consequences of canine spay/neuter and alternative approaches

Innovative Veterinary Care Journal publishes a review of research on the consequences of canine gonadectomy and of methods to sterilize dogs while preserving hormones for long-term health. In the United States, spaying or neutering a dog has become standard practice to reduce pet overpopulation. Yet recent research has shed light on the long-term health impacts… Read more


Elderly patients missing out on minimally invasive procedures

Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven benefits over “open surgery”: fewer complications, shorter hospitalization, lower rates of readmission and mortality, and lower health care costs. Unfortunately, the population that might benefit the most from this approach is under-served. A recently published study used a Medicare database to analyze minimally invasive vs. traditional open surgeries in elderly… Read more


Calcium chloride chemical sterilant in testicle vs. epididymis

Calcium chloride (CaCl) has been used as a nonsurgical alternative to castrating male dogs and cats. Dr. Raffaella Leoci of the University of Bari in Italy is the lead author of the studies elucidating the optimal formulation for using CaCl in alcohol to sterilize dogs through testicular injection. Her research team has conducted a controlled… Read more


Success! Publication of Vasalgel reversal study

Successful reversal of Vasalgel male contraceptive in rabbits For immediate release: Vasalgel’s prevention of sperm transport in the vas deferens for 14 months was reversed through an injection of sodium bicarbonate. Sperm concentration and motility returned to baseline. Results of a study of a promising new male contraceptive called VasalgelTM were published today in Basic… Read more


Successful application of Vasalgel™ male contraceptive in monkeys

Press Release Monday, Feb. 6, 2017 20:00 EST New contraceptive Vasalgel provides effective birth control in rhesus monkey groups for more than one year: report from California National Primate Research Center Results of a study of Vasalgel in rhesus macaques were published today in Basic and Clinical Andrology. Vasalgel is being developed by a social… Read more


Peer-reviewed publication of rabbit study results

If you’ve been following Vasalgel for some time, you already know that this new, long-acting contraceptive worked well in rabbits. But now it’s official! The results of the rabbit efficacy study were published this morning in Basic & Clinical Andrology, a peer-reviewed journal. The study revealed that rabbits had no sperm in their semen as… Read more